Riddles

Scripture: Judges 13-15

Learning Objectives:

  • Students will review the story of Samson and his God-given strength.
  • Students will learn about riddles and practice solving them by working together.
  • Students will review what an adjective is and how they are useful in riddles.

Guiding Question: What is a riddle and how can they be solved?

Materials: riddles on cards, paper, pencil

Procedure: Review the story of Samson focusing on the riddles that he told. Explain that riddles are often questions that contain clues to an answer without telling the answer. The idea is that it takes someone very smart to work through it. Riddles often contain adjectives. Adjectives are words that describe something such as sweet, small, strong. Give students several different riddles to work on in small groups. First, have them go through and underline the adjectives in the riddle. They can work at their own pace by reading a riddle on the front of the card and flipping the card over for the answer. Second option: You can make this into a game by verbally telling all groups the same riddle. The first group to raise their hand and tell the answer wins that round. If you play this version, tell students they must discuss the answer and agree before one person gives the answer to the teacher. Assign one spokesperson for the group who will raise the hand and tell the answer aloud.

Examples of levels:
1. Riddles may be direct with clear adjectives: What is round, tangy, and edible? Orange
2. Or riddles may be more indirect: What kind of fruit can be found in a crayon box? Orange

Consider incorporating riddles that are relevant to your culture, history or community.

Additional Questions:

  • What are some examples of riddles you have heard?

Supplemental Activities:

  • Students can make up their own riddles to share with each other. Tell students to write down 2-4 clues as questions. Then they share their riddle with their group and see if their group can guess the answer.
  • Explain that some riddles use figures of speech to make them challenging. For example: What is as light as a feather but the strongest man can’t hold it for more than 5 minutes? Breath (original source unknown). Challenge students to go beyond adjectives and make riddles that use figures of speech.

Written by: Savannah Negas